Sommartider! Vi har semesterstängt vecka 29-31. Ditt JobMatch Center tar inte ledigt men vi har inga tider för muntlig återkoppling under dessa veckor. Trevlig sommar!

A selection of scientific reports

For those who want to take an in-depth look at the scientific studies of JobMatch Talent, you have the opportunity to read about the most important studies that have been completed here. You are always welcome to contact us for more documentation.

“Swedish police chiefs lack social skills”

A new study shows that Sweden’s police chiefs rank lower than both business and public sector managers in trust, tolerance and relationship-building qualities. The three properties are linked to people’s social skills. “Social skills are important for well-functioning leadership. The fact that Sweden’s police chiefs have these shortcomings is serious,” says Dr Ann-Christine Andersson… Read more

Download the report as a PDF

Different driving forces between male and female leadership

There are very few differences between male and female leadership styles; there is a significantly greater difference between younger and older managers, for example. What a new study from the University of Gothenburg on the personality test JobMatch Talent shows is that the underlying driving forces are all the more different. These insights can help to guide recruitments, evaluations or the creation of effective incentive programmes. “Put simply, we can… Read more

Download the report as a PDF

Validity

Trevor Archer, Professor of psychology, the University of Gothenburg.

Brief overview of the scientific grounds for Trevor Archer’s recommendation of JobMatch Talent. (Archer, 2013)

Study of JobMatch Talent’s predictive validity

Bertil Mårdberg, PhD, Professor emeritus. Bertil Mårdberg has previously acted as Professor of Psychometrics at the University of Bergen, Norway, and as Professor of Leadership Psychology at the Swedish Defence University. An occupational psychology test instrument, which is used to assess candidates for recruitment, should have an actual proven prognosis ability in work-related behaviours and performance. In this study, Bertil Mårdberg investigates JobMatch Talent’s actual ability to predict work performance in a recruitment situation. The study shows that JobMatch Talent has a very good ability to predict work performance in recruitment situations. He reports three values for predictive validity here. R coefficients: 0.54, 0.70, 0.66. The mean value of the predictive validity is therefore 0.63. By comparing validity values with international studies, it is assessed that JobMatch Talent’s predictors have very high values.

Reliability

Bengt Jansson, D.Phil. in Psychology, the University of Gothenburg.

Describes a test-retest study documenting JobMatch Talent’s reliability. The average correlation of the studies shows a correlation coefficient of 0.68–0.86, which is very high. This means that JobMatch results are stable in both the long and short term. (Jansson, 2013)

Criterion validity

Bengt Jansson, D.Phil. in Psychology, the University of Gothenburg, and Henrik Winge, MPhil.

Description of a Supervisor Rating, where managers evaluated the test taker’s working methods and performance in 11 different areas, regardless of the employee’s JobMatch result. The study shows that there is clear and logical correlation between the manager’s ratings and the JobMatch results. (Jansson & Winge, 2013)

Convergent validity

Klaus Olsen and Henrik Winge, MPhil.

In the report, the convergent and discriminant validity between the concepts in JobMatch Talent and the NEO PI-R test are discussed. The authors conclude that there is a conceptual logical connection between JobMatch Talent and NEO PI-R (Olsen & Winge, 2013).

Predictive validity

Klaus Olsen

Predictive validity is perhaps the most important kind of validity for a test used in recruitment. This study examines whether JobMatch Talent can actually predict (predicate) work-related behaviour and how this prediction can be related to similar scientific studies.

Construct validity

Converging and discriminate analysis validity between JobMatchTalent and the NEO PI-R test.

Danilo Garcia, D.Phil. in psychology; Ali Al Nima, MPhil in psychology; Trevor Archer, Professor of psychology, Catrin Rappe, Max Rapp Ricciardi.

In 2013 a comprehensive study was conducted together with researchers at the University of Gothenburg. 390 people took both the JobMatch Talent test and the NEO PI-R test.

A correlation analysis was conducted and the result showed that the majority of JobMatchTalent scales had logical (what is referred to in the article as convergent) connections. The authors found that JobMatchTalent showed good construct validity (this is denoted as convergent and discriminate validity in the article).

The article has been reviewed and published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE.

Show article
Download the article as a PDF

Construct validity

Eva Langvik, Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

Construct validity is a test’s ability to actually measure the psychological concept that it has been constructed to measure. There have been two correlation studies of the relationships between JobMatch and one of the most researched tests that exists: the NEO PI-R test.

The first study was conducted in 2005 in collaboration with Professor Hilmar Nordvik and psychologist Eva Langvik from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). The study indicates that JobMatch Talent has good construct validity. (Langvik, 2005).

Recruit for future performance: Management levels and personal qualities

Catrin Rappe

Knowing which personal qualities should be sought for different managerial levels can reduce the risk of recruitment errors. The purpose of the study was to see if applicants for different management levels (lowest, middle and highest) in the private sector showed differences in personal qualities, and whether their qualities corresponded to the managerial levels.

The result showed significant differences in personal qualities between the managerial levels. Those who applied for the highest or lowest managerial levels had significantly higher mean values on the JobMatchTalent scales for extroversion and openness and significantly lower mean values for friendliness and goal-orientation. Applicants for middle management roles showed the opposite result.

Construct validity with Exploratory factor analysis

Bengt Jansson

In 2014, a study of JobMatch Talent’s construct validity was conducted with exploratory factor analysis (Jansson, 2014), based on a norm group (N = 12,650). The study looks at 8 explorative factors, analysed in relation to JobMatch Talent’s theoretical model of 10 factors. The study concludes that the explorative, as well as the theoretical, model of JobMatch Talent has good construct validity.

The Relationship between the JobMatchTalent Test and the NEO PI-R

Danilo Garcia, Ali Al Nima, Catrin Rappe, Max Rapp Ricciardi, Trevor Archer

The JobMatchTalent Test and the Big Five Model of Personality

Catrin Rappe, Ali Al Nima, Alexander Jimmefors, Erica Schütz, Trevor Archer, Danilo Garcia

JobMatchTalent Scales and Manager-Rated Work Performance

Erica Schütz, Catrin Rappe, Alexander Jimmefors, Trevor Archer, Danilo Garcia, Bengt

JobMatchTalent: An instrument for work force recruitment and development

Trevor Archer, Professor of psychology, the University of Gothenburg, Henrik Winge, MPhil. and Danilo Garcia, D.Phil. In Psychology

Show article

Published article: Study on manager’s attributes in relation to age

Professor Trevor Archer, Klaus Olsen, D.Phil. Bengt Jansson

The extensive study of 6789 completed JobMatch Talent tests has now been reviewed and published. The relationship between age and attribute was investigated for individuals who sought different managerial positions in private and public organisations.

Conclusions: The managers’ stress sensitivity, strategic focus, energy and communication were similar in younger and older managers. The leadership style of older managers seemed to be less focused on tasks and less focused on their own ambitions, instead it was more about developing employees, building relationships and team spirit.

The report is reviewed and published in the scientific journal Clinical and Experimental Psychology.

Different driving forces between male and female leadership

There are very few differences between male and female leadership styles; there is a significantly greater difference between younger and older managers, for example. What a new study from the University of Gothenburg on the DNV-GL audited personality test JobMatch Talent shows is that the underlying driving forces are all the more different. These insights can help to guide recruitments, evaluations or the creation of effective incentive programmes.

The research project that helps the police develop better leadership skills

In order to develop Sweden’s police organisation, the evaluation function at the Police’s National Operations Department, NOA, has carried out several part-studies on the leadership skills of Sweden’s police chiefs since 2012. In the latest study, three key leadership qualities of Swedish police chiefs – stress tolerance, internal drive and entrepreneurship – are measured by analysing the answers given by the police chiefs to the DNV-GL certified personality test JobMatch Talent.

New research knocks down prejudices about female and male leadership

A new study from researchers at the University of Gothenburg now shatters several conceptions about how female and male managers differ. The study examines eight characteristics closely associated with management and leadership and the results show no gender differences in seven out of eight characteristics.

“The research results, which are based on the DNV-GL certified recruitment test JobMatch Talent, show once and for all that gender does not affect the suitability of individuals or their characteristics as managers. For example, the perception that male executives take more initiatives while women are more empathetic is an entirely socially-constructed idea,” says Trevor Archer, researcher and Doctor of psychology at the University of Gothenburg.